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Discuss the fabulous movie Lost In Translation!

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switchtosake
Lost In Tokyo
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Re: Dont we all want to be travellers?

Postby switchtosake » Mon Oct 11, 2004 12:33 pm

Rogue Angel wrote:I saw the movie a couple days after returning, and was just enthralled from the beginning. I laughed and cried and even though it didn't end the way I'd hoped, it still made me smile and truly touched me, :


That's the beauty of it though...the movie can end however you want it to. Did he whisper at the and "I'll see you when we get back." or did he say "Tell him the truth" or was it "You're special".

No one knows and thats the beauty.

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Rogue Angel
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Postby Rogue Angel » Mon Oct 11, 2004 3:47 pm

Yes! I agree....and I think Roger Ebert said it best...

"We shouldn't be allowed to hear it. It's between them, and by this point in the movie, they've become real enough to deserve their privacy. Maybe he gave her his phone number. Or said he loved her. Or said she was a good person. Or thanked her. Or whispered, "Had we but world enough, and time..." and left her to look up the rest of it."

By the way, I -have- looked up the rest of that and its an Andrew Marvell poem, "To His Coy Mistress". Its pretty neato. http://www.englishverse.com/poems/to_his_coy_mistress
Sometimes you have to go half way around the world to come full circle....

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Re: Dont we all want to be travellers?

Postby Guest » Mon Oct 11, 2004 11:00 pm

Rogue Angel wrote:Sorry I blathered on and on, but I just wanted to throw my two cents in as a new person here.... :mrgreen:


Warm greetings new person and please blather on all you like! :D

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Rogue Angel
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Postby Rogue Angel » Tue Oct 12, 2004 3:26 am

lol Why thank you Mister Administrator, I may perhaps do just that. Do we mainly discuss LIT here or do we bounce off other things like music, other movies, and current events as well??

I appreciate such a warm welcome from those I've spoken to in here. Thanks guys...you rock! \m/ o.o \m/
Sometimes you have to go half way around the world to come full circle....

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Postby Guest » Tue Oct 12, 2004 5:26 pm

Rogue Angel wrote: Do we mainly discuss LIT here or do we bounce off other things like music, other movies, and current events as well??


I wanted to keep things simple unlike other forums which have a bazillion topic areas which gets confusing.

Ok since you asked, to be technical:

Music related to LIT is discussed in here. Other music is discussed in the Lounge.
Movies related (more or less) to LIT are discussed in the Related Movies forum
while of course all else is discussed in the....Lounge!
Current events?! Ok good luck and you know that would be discussed
in the......over a nice a drink of Suntory whisky, your old friend with
intensity! :shock:

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Rogue Angel
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Postby Rogue Angel » Wed Oct 13, 2004 12:35 pm

*resigned sigh* Okay okay...no politics for me on this sight. :D Sorry, I'm a political science major. That's cool, I'll just be able to relax here with other LIT'ers and not 'talk shop' as they say. So the Lounge is where we go to disucss non-LIT topics? Cool! Okay, thanks so much Bob 8)
Sometimes you have to go half way around the world to come full circle....

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Beery
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A review I wrote a long time ago (after the Oscars)

Postby Beery » Wed Dec 22, 2004 8:11 pm

I don't know what's happened to the Oscars. Maybe the Academy always voted for shallow movies? All I know is that Lord of the Rings must be about the least deserving Oscar winner of all time, and Lost in Translation must be the unluckiest Oscar nominee of all time. To my mind, Lost In Translation should have swept the Oscars this year. All I can think is that the judges just didn't get it. Shame!

This movie deserved better in terms of accolades. Not many directors can make such a subtle yet deeply moving piece of art, and the fact that this director emerged from a Hollywood environment makes her achievement even greater. Bravo Sofia Coppola and the cast and crew of Lost In Translation! This is an awesome movie, and the shameful lack of laurels it received from the industry only reflects poorly on those who couldn't see its greatness.

One more thing - about the racism that some seem to see in the film. I just don't see it. Sure, there are some tongue-in-cheek remarks made (in jest) about cultural differences, but that's the reality of people trying to connect in a foreign environment. It may be culture-ist, but I just don't see the racism. The same kind of jokes would have arisen if the movie had been set in Rome, Athens, London or Berlin, where the population tends to be racially similar to America. As I saw it, the Americans were as much the butt of the jokes as were the Japanese. Anyway, do films that strive to be authentic really have to be politically correct? I don't think so.

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Postby Just Like Honey... » Thu Dec 23, 2004 12:43 am

When I first heard anyone mention the topic of racism in LiT, i honestly didn't have any idea what they were talking about. I just really didn't pick up on that vibe at all.
Just a note about the Oscars, LiT wasn't exactly a high-budget film, so I really didn't expect it to sweep. I don't even watch the Oscars anymore because they've basically been dumbed down to a show where they award the "coolest, highest budget, most publically accepted movie out there" all of the awards. If they don't do that, then people will get pissed off and stop watching it. This is all IMHO of course. :)
I'd rather be a gear in a big, deterministic, physical machine than just some random swerving.

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Postby jml98 » Thu Dec 23, 2004 1:57 am

Just Like Honey... wrote:When I first heard anyone mention the topic of racism in LiT, i honestly didn't have any idea what they were talking about.


some claim that the film mocks the Japanese. For example, when Charlotte and Bob are talking at night in the room, Charlotte asks Bob "Why do they switch the L's and the R's here?", referring to how the Japanese pronounce words with L's and R's (b/c of their accent, they pronounce "r" as "l" and vice versa. e.g. the word "please" sounds like "prease") Another example is at the end, when Bob and Charlotte say goodbye in the hotel lobby. Bob says , "well, aren't you going to wish me a good fright?", which, again, refers to the Japanese people's accent (he means "flight") I can see why people would think its racist, but i don't think it is, or at least, it wasn't intended to be
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Beery
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Postby Beery » Thu Dec 23, 2004 9:13 am

jml98 wrote:I can see why people would think its racist, but i don't think it is, or at least, it wasn't intended to be


I think it's a movie about two people. People - even nice people - can make jokes about other cultures. It's a fact of life. When people are in a foreign land they joke about what seems funny to them about the culture, and in Japan, it has to be the stuff Charlotte and Bob make fun of in the movie. Heck, when I was in Germany I joked about the way all Germans are so law-abiding, and how the buses and trains are never ever late. Was I being politically incorrect? Sure, but it's what people do to have fun. I'm sure that Japanese people in the US and Europe joke about how tall everyone is. If people are going to get all thin-skinned about little jokes at their expense I think it's about time they grew up.

In the end, it's a movie, and movies like this are supposed to show us life, warts and all. It's irrelevant whether the characters are racist or not as long as they are true to themselves.

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Luigi
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Postby Luigi » Sun Jun 12, 2005 9:15 pm

I wrote this review last year and published it in my blog. Unfortunately, it's in Portuguese. Anyway, if you can read it I think you're going to enjoy my thoughts about this fantastic movie.

****

Encontros e Desencontros: uma janela para a vida

Em Lost In Translation, alguns elementos aparentemente poéticos revelam-se profundamente simbólicos. Ao assistirmos o filme despretensiosamente, não notamos esses aspectos. Mas uma observação atenta logo revela a perspicácia -- estética e cultural -- do olhar de Sofia Coppola.

***

Mais que perdidos na tradução, como o título em inglês sugere, os protagonistas estão perdidos em meio aos exageros da comunicação de massa, ou melhor dizendo, do entretenimento massificado. Por todos os lados, vemos luminosos, pôsteres, anúncios, luzes, música, cores artificiais, enlatados na TV, videogames, vítimas da moda. É a sociedade do espetáculo, usando o conceito criado por Guy Debord, em toda a sua glória. Na Tóquio do filme, observamos nitidamente o que os atuais teóricos da comunicação chamam de “síndrome do excesso de informação”. O fato dessa informação estar em japonês, língua completamente alienígena para nós, ocidentais, apenas ressalta o estranhamento, a sensação de solidão. A overdose informativa, ao invés de aproximar as pessoas, as afasta -- ficamos como pequenos náufragos sendo levados pelas ondas do mar midiático. O máximo que podemos fazer, como Bob Harris e Charlotte no filme, é observar com um certo distanciamento, tentando decifrar o que move todo aquele universo. Observar tudo por meio de janelas, janelas de automóveis em movimento ou da altura reconfortante do Hotel Hyatt.

***

De fato, janelas estão sempre presentes no filme. Charlotte vê Tóquio de cima, do quarto do hotel, durante o dia e também à noite, com sua miríade de pontos luminosos. Ela também vê Tóquio lá embaixo, circulando em táxis amarelos, iguais aos de Nova Iorque. E rua após rua, esquina após esquina, um mar de signos, significados e significantes. Um contraste brutal com a falta de comunicação íntima entre os casais do enredo, ou melhor, entre todos os habitantes das grandes metrópoles. Não é preciso estar em Tóquio para sentir esse vazio. Não é preciso fazer parte de um filme, pois todos nós somos Bobs Harris e Charlottes, personagens da vida real querendo ser encontrados, notados. A busca frenética pelos quinze minutos de fama jogou para baixo do tapete a busca por um relacionamento rico, simples e pleno de sentimentos.

***

Uma vez que as janelas da vida estão cada vez mais embaçadas pela tempestade da comunicação massificada, as pessoas começam a buscar uma saída em outras janelas. Ponto para Bill Gates, que soube batizar seu produto de maior sucesso. Ora, vejam só. É com ajuda do Windows, ironia suprema, que a maioria dos internautas busca companhia nas inúmeras salas de chat, nos blogs (como este), nos flogs e nos instant messengers. Lá fora, atrás do vidro, só vemos néons em japonês, por mais que nos esforcemos a entender -- então, quem sabe, talvez as respostas estejam atrás de um computador, com seus chips made in Taiwan. Quem sabe. Sofia Coppola não chegou a esse ponto, mas passou perto.

***

Falando em relacionamentos ricos, simples e plenos de sentimento, há tempos não via uma química tão forte entre personagens de um filme. Bill Murray e Scarlett Johansson transmitem um força intensa em cada ato, em cada “olá” simpático trocado nos corredores do suntuoso hotel. A ligação que surge entre os dois é tão pura que não merece ser conspurcada pelo sexo. É algo muito além da simples troca de fluidos corporais, coisa, aliás, que o personagem de Bill Murray faz com a cantora do bar, sem nenhum glamour, apenas um grande ressentimento na manhã seguinte.

***

O final de Lost In Translation é o pico emocional da história. Não é um final particularmente feliz, mas carregado de força dramática. Apesar de não ouvirmos o que Bob diz a Charlotte em meio à agitação da rua apinhada, conhecemos em nosso íntimo cada palavra. Em meu cérebro, toda vez que vejo esse cena, escuto algo como “Tóquio sempre será nossa. Lembre-se disso.” Assim como eu, cada espectador tem a sua versão, o seu desfecho oculto --, formulado enquanto começa a tocar os primeiros acordes de Just Like Honey, do Jesus & Mary Chain. É quase impossível não deixar rolar uma lágrima.

***

E você? Está acordado ou continua mergulhado em sonhos de néon? Quem é você, afinal? Está conformado ou quer More Than This?
Last edited by Luigi on Mon Oct 11, 2010 5:02 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Gats
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Sex/Nudity - EXTREME

Postby Gats » Fri Feb 15, 2008 7:51 am

http://www.screenit.com/movies/2003/los ... ation.html

Sex/Nudity
Extreme

I like this part :D

I'm still wondering which scene contains this EXTREME NUDITY ???

Aww, yes, I know, those ladies jumping/dancing in swimming-pool,
that was too much hehe.

Anyway, fantastic movie.

Best regards for LIT fans from Poland.
" Let's never come here again because it will never be as much fun. "

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Beery
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Postby Beery » Fri Feb 15, 2008 10:45 am

Yeah, that's an interesting site. Who would have guessed that some folks see LiT as a somewhat violent porn movie. We'd all better lock up our sons and daughters when filth like this is on our TV screens, LOL.
You want more mysterious? I'll just try and think, "Where the hell's the whiskey?"

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Postby LostCalls » Sat Feb 16, 2008 4:00 am

I love how the following represents "Disrespectful/Bad Attitude"

Bob and Charlotte lie side-by-side on a bed (clothed) as they chat and he briefly puts his hand on her foot. Although both are unhappy with their marriages, Bob and Charlotte teeter on cheating with each other (they do briefly kiss on the lips as they say good-bye, but nothing else happens).

Man...I can't even comment on how bad that attitude is!

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Beery
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Postby Beery » Sat Feb 16, 2008 9:03 am

LOL I missed that one. I guess touching someone's foot has a whole lot of implications I never even guessed at. Hey, I mean technically they DID 'sleep' together and if bob's hand represents his penis and Charlotte's foot represents her vagina, they could be said to have boinked like bunnies.

Seriously though, for someone to misunderstand the film so badly that they think Bob and Charlotte were "teetering on cheating with each other" then I reckon they have a lot more sex on the brain than they'll find in the average Hollywood movie.

I love the following quote:

"Following that night of partying, Bob carries Charlotte back to her room and she never wakes up (she may or may not be passed out and nothing happens between them)."


Because (according to whoever wrote this silly review on Screen It) when a woman has fallen asleep (or passed out due to alcohol poisoning) it's only natural for the man to want to rape her. Such an act is regarded as 'something happening 'BETWEEN' them - as if the woman is taking an active role. Not only does this show that the reviewer regards men as little more than brutes, but it also says something about his/her views on a woman's individual responsibility, which the reviewer seems to think exists even when the woman is asleep. The phrase "She was asking for it - they're all asking for it" (from an old comedy sketch about a psychopath) comes to mind. I mean how misogynistic can this reviewer get?

I notice also that the main problem the reviewer has with the film has to do with drinking alcohol in a bar - the review devotes more space to what happens in the hotel bar than it devotes to any other single subject (more even than sex/nudity). Apparently drinking in a bar, this perfectly legal and socially accepted activity, is beyond the pale for this reviewer. I mean heaven forbid that a child should walk past a pub and ask his parents what people are doing in there. Presumably this reviewer regards the idea of bars as being similar to brothels in terms of their potential negative effect on young minds.

All-in-all, I think this reviewer is potentially a LOT more dangerous for kids to be around than anything they might see in LiT (or any Hollywood movie for that matter). I worry that this person has kids and I worry what harm his/her 13th century attitude is doing to their minds.
You want more mysterious? I'll just try and think, "Where the hell's the whiskey?"

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Postby Cryogenic » Wed Feb 04, 2009 9:20 pm

I know this is a really, really old topic, but I couldn't resist.

Beery wrote:I love the following quote:

"Following that night of partying, Bob carries Charlotte back to her room and she never wakes up (she may or may not be passed out and nothing happens between them)."


Because (according to whoever wrote this silly review on Screen It) when a woman has fallen asleep (or passed out due to alcohol poisoning) it's only natural for the man to want to rape her. Such an act is regarded as 'something happening 'BETWEEN' them - as if the woman is taking an active role. Not only does this show that the reviewer regards men as little more than brutes, but it also says something about his/her views on a woman's individual responsibility, which the reviewer seems to think exists even when the woman is asleep. The phrase "She was asking for it - they're all asking for it" (from an old comedy sketch about a psychopath) comes to mind. I mean how misogynistic can this reviewer get?

I notice also that the main problem the reviewer has with the film has to do with drinking alcohol in a bar - the review devotes more space to what happens in the hotel bar than it devotes to any other single subject (more even than sex/nudity). Apparently drinking in a bar, this perfectly legal and socially accepted activity, is beyond the pale for this reviewer. I mean heaven forbid that a child should walk past a pub and ask his parents what people are doing in there. Presumably this reviewer regards the idea of bars as being similar to brothels in terms of their potential negative effect on young minds.

All-in-all, I think this reviewer is potentially a LOT more dangerous for kids to be around than anything they might see in LiT (or any Hollywood movie for that matter). I worry that this person has kids and I worry what harm his/her 13th century attitude is doing to their minds.


Their insularity/ignorance runs even deeper than that:

GUNS/WEAPONS
Bob watches a Japanese movie that shows a man with a sword already in his gut (we don't know from what and there's no blood or gore) as he falls over.

After a drunken patron gets rowdy, a bartender pulls out what appears to be a machine gun and fires at him and others (we see flashes of light from its barrel, but it must be a fake or toy as no bullets come out).


Even though this person has a section dedicated to GUNS/WEAPONS, they fail to realise:

1) In the former example, a character is performing seppuku: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seppuku

2) In the latter example, a character is using a BB gun: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BB_gun

Not knowing what you're talking about. That is the price of leading a sheltered life according to a warped moral code.

One thing the "guide" does bring to mind is how much drinking, or references to drinking, there are in LIT. A lot! Man, we should devise some drinking games.

On a more serious note, I am dismayed at their lack of thoroughness, which clearly brings the whole thing into disrepute. For example:

VIOLENCE
Bob accidentally breaks a lamp while trying to get away from an apparently crazed masseuse.

Bob watches a Japanese movie that shows a man with a sword already in his gut (we don't know from what and there's no blood or gore) as he falls over.

After a drunken patron gets rowdy, a bartender pulls out what appears to be a machine gun and fires at him and others (we see flashes of light from its barrel, but it must be a fake or toy as no bullets come out). He then chases after that man who then throws a bottle back in the bartender's direction on the street where it breaks upon impact.


As well as repeating their noted errors, this person fails to mention the two Americans who recognise Bob at the bar and start talking about a dangerous car stunt he performed, or another car stunt later shown on TV in Bob's room, or the ickiness of Charlotte stubbing her toe against a piece of furniture (ouch!), or the deadly golf swing Bob makes in the direction of Mount Fuji or, worst of all, the extreme violence of Best Hit TV's Matthew Minami's jacket. I am appalled.

Finally:

Disrespectful/
Bad Attitude

Heavy


ROFLCOPTER!
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Beery
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Postby Beery » Thu Feb 05, 2009 1:02 am

I started reading the bit where you quoted me (I didn't notice that it was me), and I was amazed how much I agreed with that guy. Then I realized the guy was me, LOL.

So long since I've been back here - I love getting the occasional notification from this site.

Must watch LiT again soon.
You want more mysterious? I'll just try and think, "Where the hell's the whiskey?"


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